Yogurt

 

YOGURT

Yogurt and other cultured dairy products are made by adding specific cultures to fluid dairy products in order to convert some lactose (milk sugar) into lactic acid. The aroma, body and flavor of these products can vary, depending on the type of culture and milk, amount of milkfat and non-fat milk solids, fermentation process and temperature used.

Yogurt is a mixture of milk (whole, reduced-fat, low-fat or non-fat) and cream fermented by a culture of lactic acid-producing bacteria, Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. Other bacteria (e.g., acidophilus) and other strains of the above bacteria may be added to the culture. Sweeteners (e.g., sugar, honey, aspartame), flavorings (e.g., vanilla, coffee) and other ingredients (e.g., fruits, preserves, stabilizers such as gelatin) may also be added. Yogurt contains at least 3.25% milkfat and 8.25% non-fat solids. The mixture of dairy products and optional ingredients, except bulky flavorings, must be pasteurized or ultrapasteurized. The milk in most yogurts is also homogenized.

Varieties of Yogurt

Low-fat yogurt is similar in composition to yogurt except that it contains either 0.5%, 1%, 1.5% or 2% milkfat.

Non-fat yogurt is similar in composition to yogurt and lowfat yogurt except that it contains less than 0.5% milkfat.

Yogurt beverages, which may be a combination of yogurt and milk or may be created from different acid-producing bacteria than yogurt, also may also be characterized by fat content.

Yogurt By the Numbers

1 Cup (8 oz.)

Calories

Fat

Calcium

 

(Kcal)

(g)

(mg)

Whole-milk, plain

150

8.0

296

Low-fat, plain

155

4.0

447

Low-fat, vanilla

209

3.0

419

Low-fat, fruit

243

3.0

339

Non-fat, plain

137

0.4

488

Source: USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference